Tag Archives: Sports Radio 950 KJR

Thoughts on the Percy Harvin Trade

17 Oct
Photo Credit: seahawks.com

Photo Credit: seahawks.com

Today the Seahawks made a rather shocking transaction, trading wide receiver Percy Harvin to the New York Jets for a 2015 conditional draft pick. The draft pick could range anywhere from a 2nd round pick to a 4th round pick, however it has not been disclosed how the pick will be determined (i.e. Harvin’s playing time, etc.). Here are my brief thoughts on today’s trade.

In the short term I am not a fan of this trade. Without Percy Harvin our two starting wide receivers are now Doug Baldwin and Jermaine Kearse with Ricardo Lockette likely seeing an expanded role. Baldwin will likely return kickoffs. Paul Richardson and Kevin Norwood (who is now on the active roster) may also be called upon in an expanded role moving forward. Losing Golden Tate in free agency also makes this trade look worse at this point; because the Seahawks are simply down a receiver and now will move forward without the on-field talents of both players.

Something that head coach Pete Carroll and general manager John Schneider have preached since day one is that it is their way or the highway; if you do not agree with the philosophy of the organization, no matter who you are, you will be gone. This is exactly what happened in Percy Harvin’s case. Multiple reports suggest that Harvin had become a cancer in the Seahawks locker room and that his anger issues had become a serious problem. Lance Zierlein, a sports talk personality in Houston called in to Sports Radio 950 KJR this afternoon to shed some light on the situation, which included multiple incidents that may have expedited the end of the line for Harvin in Seattle. Zierlein reported that back during Super Bowl week in January, Harvin got into a heated argument with then-Seahawks receiver Golden Tate. The confrontation led to Harvin punching Tate in the face, and you can tell that the remnants of Tate’s black eye were still visible during the Super Bowl postgame awards ceremony. Over the offseason and into this season Harvin was becoming increasingly upset about his situation in Seattle and complained that he wanted out. The final straw came earlier this season when Harvin initiated a shouting match with Russell Wilson which nearly led to a fight. From the organizations standpoint, you can’t pick a fight with the quarterback and expect to stick around. It was then that the front office realized it needed to move Harvin immediately before the entire locker room culture was destroyed.

In the short term it will be tough to replace Harvin on the field, but there are two silver linings all 12’s need to take into account. First is the draft pick we will be receiving from the Jets. If all goes well and the Jets keep losing, it is possible that the draft pick we will receive will be in the mid-30’s which some may consider being a very late first rounder. Second, by moving Harvin we have more cap space to resign some of our more important players in future years. Bobby Wagner and Russell Wilson immediately come to mind in that regard.

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Review: Seahawks 36, Packers 16

4 Sep
Photo Credit: seattletimes.com

Photo Credit: seattletimes.com

What a way to start our title defense! In front of a nationally televised audience the Seahawks defeated the Green Bay Packers in decisive fashion on Thursday night by a final score of 36-16. The Seahawks start their 2014 season 1-0 while the Packers start their third straight season 0-1. Although the Seahawks won in dominating fashion I believe there is still a lot of room for improvement. Nevertheless, I believe we confirmed to any and every doubter that we are still a force capable of repeating as Super Bowl champions. Here are the positives and negatives I took from Thursday’s game.

Every Weapon Will Be Used: One of the reasons why the Seahawks have the potential to be so dangerous this season is that quarterback Russell Wilson will use every weapon in his arsenal. That was evident on Thursday night when he hit wide receiver Ricardo Lockette for a 33-yard touchdown in the second quarter and fullback Derrick Coleman for a 15-yard touchdown in the fourth quarter. There are probably few people who thought either Lockette or Coleman would have a touchdown in this game let alone both of them. Meanwhile Doug Baldwin and Jermaine Kearse, two receivers who see more playing time than Lockette, combined for 4 catches and only 22 yards. The Seahawks are not afraid to use every single offensive skill position player at any time during the game. This makes the Seahawks a very scary team to game plan around and try to prepare for moving forward.

Lynch Has Not Missed a Step: On the drive home from the game, Dave “Softy” Mahler, Dick Fain, and Hugh Millen of Sports Radio 950 KJR agreed that they thought Marshawn Lynch looked “like a guy playing for a contract” and that he has not slowed down at all. I agree completely. Lynch was the most effective player on offense this week rushing for 110 yards and two touchdowns. Lynch, like always, ran like a man on a mission and if there was any rumblings of a potential running back by committee if Lynch were to struggle, he quickly squashed them. Barring injury, Lynch will continue to be the feature back in this offense and from my perspective our running game has picked up right where it left off at the end of the 2013 season.

Pass Rush Can Improve: Cliff Avril, Michael Bennett, and O’Brien Schofield all recorded sacks on Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers this week. Although the Seahawks pass rush looked effective, there is much room for improvement. The reason I say this is because of the Green Bay offensive line. With two players making their CenturyLink Field debut and right tackle Bryan Bulaga leaving the game with a sprained knee in the first half, I thought the Seahawks would be able to take advantage with a revved up 12th Man behind them to sack Rodgers in a similar fashion to the 8 sacks we recorded against the Packers two seasons ago. One of my main focuses going into this game was the interior pass rush and in this game the grand majority of the Seahawks defensive pressure came on the outside. I would like to see an improvement next week along the inside of the defensive line, using a 3rd down package with Bennett as well as young defensive tackle talent like Jordan Hill.

Did Thomas Lose His Job?: Before I go any further, no I am not talking about his free safety job. I am talking solely about his spot as the Seahawks punt returner. Forget that Richard Sherman may have been blocked into him, Earl Thomas muffed a first quarter punt which was recovered by Packers safety Ha Ha Clinton-Dix and eventually led to a touchdown to give Green Bay a 7-3 lead. The punt that Thomas muffed should definitely have been signaled for a fair catch but Thomas tried to make something out of what clearly looked to be nothing. Thomas returned one more punt for a 3-yard return later in the game. I no doubt believe that Thomas can make special plays happen on special teams but he simply needs to be smarter about the way he goes about handling his punt return duties. One more mistake by Thomas on special teams and I believe will see the next man up at punt returner, who happens to be Richard Sherman.

Where Are You Sherm?: It is going to be very difficult for Richard Sherman to hold the title of “best shutdown corner in the game” from a statistical perspective if teams continue to avoid him, much like what the Green Bay Packers did on Thursday night. Sherman was not targeted once against the Packers, which created opportunities for Byron Maxwell and Jeremy Lane to take advantage of. Maxwell had 5 tackles, 2 passes defensed and an interception on Thursday night while Lane recorded 4 tackles of his own in the nickel slot. This could be a common occurrence especially early in the season. Maxwell will be tested often and if he plays shutdown football, opposing defenses may have no choice but to throw in Sherman’s direction as well. Sherman’s chances will depend on the play of the rest of the receivers. Although he played well against the Packers, if Maxwell struggles he will be picked on constantly and it will be extremely difficult for Richard Sherman to see passes thrown his way.

Thoughts on Green Bay: Take away the fact that the Green Bay Packers had to come into the NFL’s most hostile environment on opening night to play the defending world champions in front of a 12th Man that may have been louder than I have ever heard. This Packers team has an offense that will be able to effectively move the ball and they gained solid defensive momentum early in the game when they held a short lead. The running game must improve however. Running back Eddie Lacy only ran for 34 yards on Thursday night and not being able to run the ball effectively could extremely limit the Packers offense, relying on Aaron Rodgers more than they would like. With a banged up offensive line this may be difficult but as long as Rodgers can stay healthy, I believe this team is still better than the Bears, Lions, and Vikings. This team is still my favorite to win the NFC North.

Random Thoughts: John Parry was the referee this week. I apologize I could not figure out the referee before the game for the second consecutive week. Parry and his crew went into Thursday’s game known for throwing the most defensive holding penalties during the preseason, which some believed could have hurt the Seahawks. The Seahawks were flagged 4 times throughout the game and none of them were for defensive holding… The Westlake Center Buffalo Wild Wings has by far the best service of any “B-Dubs” I’ve been to. Maybe it was because we were one of the first parties seated for the day and the restaurant was mostly empty. Nevertheless, great service and great food too… The atmosphere at the Hawks Nest Bar and Grill never disappoints, especially before a primetime game. It was awesome in that building before the game… The pregame ceremony and celebration did not disappoint. There was one thing about pregame that I really liked and one thing that I really did not like. I liked how the Seahawks told everybody with tickets to be in their seats by 5pm for the pregame celebration but the pregame ceremonies did not start until NBC went live at 5:30. Smart thinking Seahawks. The thing I found slightly disappointing what that they unveiled the banner simultaneous to the team running out of the tunnel. I wish they would have waited until right before the game started to drop the banner… That may have been the most fun I’ve had at a Seahawks game ever. The crowd was so merry and confident. It was a truly special night all around.

The Seahawks take an extended break before getting to work on the San Diego Chargers next week. Enjoy this weekend’s games everyone. Go Hawks!

Making Memories: An NFC Championship Commentary

15 Jan

*On Sunday the Seahawks will host the NFC Championship Game for the second time in franchise history as a part of what I have dubbed “Hate Week Part III” with the San Francisco 49ers. I was in attendance at the first NFC Championship Game in 2006 and I am hoping that this week’s game against the 49ers will be just as, if not more special than the first*

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This was the scene on January 22nd, 2006 as the Seahawks ran out of the tunnel before the 2005 NFC Championship Game.

Pictures sure do say a thousand words, don’t they? 67,000 fans screaming at ear-damaging decibel levels while waving their white rally towels; one of the most amazing sights these eyes have ever seen and been a part of.

This Sunday the Seahawks host the San Francisco 49ers in the 2013 NFC Championship Game in what I believe is the biggest home game in Seahawks history; even bigger than the 2005 NFC Championship Game against the Carolina Panthers.

Pick any Seahawks home game over the past 8 years and I could tell you some detail or memory about it. Every Seahawks game I attend becomes a collection of memories. Some of them are good, some of them are bad, yet every single game I have ever attended is its own unique story.

I can still distinctly remember that cloudy January day in 2006. Sports Radio 950 KJR had done a live broadcast from a pioneer square bar overnight leading all the way up to game time. I had turned the radio on in my room and at a very soft volume and I subconsciously listened to the entire overnight portion of the pregame show while I attempted to sleep. When I woke up in the morning I immediately got dressed into my gameday attire, my 2005 NFC West Champions hat, and my blue Matt Hasselbeck jersey over my white Seahawks sweatshirt. My friend Alan and I headed into downtown where after waiting for at a table at the waterfront Red Robin, we decided to instead walk down to Ivar’s for a fish n’ chips pregame meal. Following lunch we decided to head straight into the stadium and we hung out at our seats in section 302 for two hours as we watched the entire stadium fill up before the Seahawks even concluded on-field warm-ups about 25 minutes before kickoff. I was amazed how full and crazed the stadium was that early. Everybody was at their seats with plenty of time to spare and the mood was utter excitement and confidence, as if there was no doubt that we were going to walk off the field as the 2005 NFC Champions. Following the most beautiful rendition of the “Star-Spangled Banner” I had ever heard (performed by the beautiful and talented Carrie Underwood) Alan and I briefly sat down just before kickoff. We knew we had to charge up our lower bodies as we did not sit down for the duration of the game; a feat that has not been repeated in the 82 preseason, regular season, and postseason games I have attended since. Just before kickoff Seahawks owner Paul Allen raised the 12th Man flag; the most epic sports moment I have ever been a part of.

The game went just as everyone in attendance hoped it would. Jerramy Stevens caught a touchdown pass to make the score 7-0 Seahawks and following a Lofa Tatupu interception later in the first quarter, the Seahawks had taken control of the game for good. Starting at this point the 12th Man started several “Super Bowl” chants following every score and timeout. 2 Josh Brown field goals, a Darrell Jackson touchdown catch and two touchdown runs by league MVP Shaun Alexander cemented a 34-14 win as the Seahawks punched their ticket to Super Bowl XL.

An extended postgame fireworks celebration and large quantities of blue and green confetti bathed the entire stadium as the Seahawks and the 12th Man entered full party mode. By the time the clock hit :00 no one had left the stadium and quite frankly no one wanted to. The 12th Man wanted to soak in the greatest moment in the history of Seahawks football for as long as they could. A stage was wheeled to mid-field as Terry Bradshaw of FOX presented Paul Allen, coach Mike Holmgren, Matt Hasselbeck, and Shaun Alexander with the George Halas memorial trophy, emblematic of the champions of the National Football Conference. At the end of ceremony Alexander took the trophy on a victory lap around the stadium to “show everybody” as Terry Bradshaw advised him to do. After the Seahawks left the field and headed back into the locker room Alan and I headed for the gates to head home. My friends are amazed at the selective memory I have for every Seahawks game I have ever attended but I can say with full confidence that there is no game I can remember more clearly than the 2005 NFC Championship Game.

I will be taking my Dad to this year’s NFC Championship game; an event that I am sure will be made a memory for him and me to bond over for years to come. Needless to say this will be a very special moment between the two of us, made even more special since he will not be going to New York with me to attend Super Bowl XLVIII should the Seahawks win this week. I am very excited for him to experience everything an event like the NFC Championship Game has to offer.

When we beat Carolina to get to Super Bowl XL no Seahawks fan went out of their way to make fun of or insult any Panthers fan in attendance, or to make them feel any worse that their team did not make it to the Super Bowl. I realize that our ticket to Super Bowl XLVIII will come at the expense of the one team Seahawks fans hate the most but my ultimate hope is that the same celebratory actions from 2005 repeat themselves this week. I know it would be the sweetest feeling in the world to beat the 49ers to get to the Super Bowl but that should not mean that the 12th Man should go out of their way to emotionally pummel any 49ers fans in attendance. Simply put, this is OUR moment to shine. Do not make it about them. This game and this potential victory should be made all about US by US. If we win, celebrate the win as a Seahawks victory, not a Seahawks victory AND a 49ers loss. make sure to also revel in the amazing scene that will take place following the game. This is an experience that every sports fan dreams of. To everyone lucky enough to attend the 2013 NFC Championship Game, savor every moment and even the smallest little details of your gameday experience because I promise you this will be an event that you will never forget

Review: 49ers 19, Seahawks 17

9 Dec
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Photo Credit: seahawks.com

Although the NFC West championship and home field advantage is still all but certain, if for any reason we completely fall apart and miss out on either of these two scenarios this is the game the Seahawks and their fans will look back on as the turning point in the season. The Seahawks 7 game losing streak has come to an end and our quest for the division title must wait at least one more week as the Seahawks fell to the San Francisco 49ers 19-17 on Sunday. The Seahawks fall to 11-2 and now lead the 9-4 49ers by 2 games in the NFC West. There are a lot of frustrating moments that may have ultimately changed the outcome of the game. This is what I saw.

2nd Half Defense Does its Part: Over the past couple of seasons the Seahawks have been one of the best teams in the league when it comes to halftime adjustments and improvements. The defense stepped up and shut down the 49ers offense in the second half, holding them to only 3 points (for the sake of this section, forget those points were the ultimate difference in the game). The defensive pressure on 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick was cranked up as Clinton McDonald and Chris Clemons each recorded a crucial sack on third down plays in the fourth quarter. Byron Maxwell once again stepped up in place of Walter Thurmond, recording 5 tackles, 3 passes defensed, and an interception. Overall the Seahawks defense only allowed 19 points to a solid 49ers offense which should be enough in order to win. Unfortunately the Seahawks failed to get any momentum going on offense to parallel the effort of the defense.

2nd Half Offense Fails to Show: When I went to Houston back in September the Seahawks were down by 17 points at halftime. Although I was surprised and disappointed I never gave up hope that the Seahawks could comeback because prior to that game they had proven that they could come back facing a deficit of at least 20 points. The Seahawks trailed the 49ers by 2 points at halftime and my overall feeling was that Darrell Bevell and Russell Wilson would make the necessary adjustments for the offense to comeback, take the lead, and potentially blow this game wide open. That never happened. The Seahawks only scored 3 points of their own in the second half and missed opportunities denied Seattle the chance to extend drives and perhaps put points on the board. Marshawn Lynch only ran for 72 yards and a touchdown on 20 carries and it felt as though the Seahawks number one priority this week was to move the ball through the air even though Russell Wilson only threw the ball 25 times for 199 yards, a touchdown, and an interception. I give lots of credit to the San Francisco secondary, especially cornerback Tramaine Brock and safety Eric Reid for their impressive blanket coverage on all Seahawks receivers. As the game went along the belief remained that the Seahawks would make a run at taking control of the game because I knew they could but as the minutes ticked off the clock the worse our chances became and by the time we got the ball back for our final drive it was too little too late and the clock had struck midnight.

Penalties Doom Seahawks: While watching Sunday NFL Countdown on ESPN in my hotel room prior to leaving for Candlestick Park, one analyst boldly predicted that this week’s Seahawks/49ers game would break an NFL record for most number of penalties in a single game. It sure felt like he was right but the calls that went against the Seahawks came at the worst times. Instead of extending drives, penalties backed the Seahawks so far back that the drives predictably stalled and the Seahawks were forced to punt, trading potential points for goose-eggs and a change of possession. In a nutshell, I strongly believe that the 49ers did not beat the Seahawks but that the Seahawks beat the Seahawks. Two Marshawn Lynch first down runs were called back for holding, a long completion to Golden Tate was called back for offensive pass interference because Tate pushed off of his defender, and on a 4th and 5 while in punt formation it appeared that a 49er defender jumped offside, which caused the Seahawks to point towards the other side of the line of scrimmage. Instead of a 5-yard offsides penalty and an automatic first down, it was ruled a false start and the Seahawks backed up 5 yards. In total, the Seahawks committed 9 penalties for 85 yards. About half of those penalty yards came on long, potential game altering plays.

The Gamble and the Two Plays that Changed the Game: After the Seahawks took a 17-16 lead the 49ers got the ball back with 6:20 left in the game. The Seahawks had two timeouts to work with and with the way the defense had been playing, I felt that it was entirely possible that we could force a quick drive and get the ball back to attempt to pad our lead. Instead, the 49ers gave the ball to running back Frank Gore who galloped 51 yards on the fourth play of the drive and all of a sudden the 49ers went from having the ball in their own territory to having the ball in the red zone, well within field goal range. After Kendall Hunter ran for one yard on the next play coach Carroll decided to take our second timeout and it was clear how he was going to play the end of the game; use both timeouts and the two-minute warning to stop the 49ers with enough time to allow them to kick a field goal and for us to go down the field into field goal range for Steven Hauschka to win the game. Carroll used the Seahawks final timeout after a 2-yard run by Gore and all the Seahawks needed to do was stop San Francisco to set up a 49ers field goal with 2:00 left. Instead Carroll’s gamble backfired and the Seahawks allowed the second most important play of the game; a first down scramble by Kaepernick to give San Francisco a fresh set of downs and the ability to run the clock down under a minute, kick a field goal, and leave the Seahawks virtually no time to go down the field and score. If I was Pete Carroll I would have waited to use our timeouts after the two minute warning which would have given us about one extra minute of game clock. I do not blame Carroll for the decision he made because he had trust in a unit that had not given up any points in the second half up until this point in the game. Unfortunately it nipped the Seahawks in the bud.

49ers Played Like They Wanted it More: On Saturday night, Mitch Levy of Sports Radio 950 KJR tweeted that the attitudes and body language of 49ers players in interviews leading up to this week’s game showed a team that was uptight; so uptight that, as Levy stated “you can’t get a blade of grass up their asses.” San Francisco sure did not play like that at all. The 49ers came out firing with full confidence and I got the sense that they did a remarkable job preparing for what the Seahawks were going to throw at them on both sides of the ball.  They fed off the energy of their home crowd and scoring 16 points in the first half alone gave their defense extreme confidence to shut the Seahawks offense down. The 49ers did not play as an uptight team, but as a team that had a “we have nothing to lose” mentality when in reality this was a game they definitely needed to win to continue to control their own destiny in the NFC wild-card race.

Injury Analysis: Linebacker K.J. Wright broke a bone in his foot on Sunday and there is an estimated recovery time of at least six weeks. If that is the case, Wright could make it back in time to play in Super Bowl XLVIII should the Seahawks make it. Wright however remains hopeful that he will be healthy enough to return in time for the start of the playoffs, as was portrayed on his Twitter shortly after Sunday’s game. Max Unger and Jeron Johnson also exited the game this week and both did not return. Unger is dealing with a strained pectoral muscle and Johnson pulled a hamstring. To my knowledge their statuses for next week against the New York Giants is unknown. Losing Wright, a starter on defense, hurts but Malcolm Smith stepped in for Wright and did a good job. Unger is the man I would be the most worried about. Unger is the anchor of the offensive line and if the Seahawks are going to be without him for any length of time, we may see shades of the Seahawks teams that struggled against St. Louis and Tampa Bay.

Thoughts on San Francisco: The 49ers looked like a team that could make the playoffs as a wild-card and make a run deep into the playoffs, assuming of course that they do not run into Seattle along that road. The defense played a really good football game and if Frank Gore is feeling it he is extremely hard to stop. The addition of Michael Crabtree back into the lineup also adds firing power to the cannon of Colin Kaepernick. If the 49ers have to come to Seattle in the playoffs they will most likely lose but I would not be surprised to see the 49ers make it to at least the divisional round if not the NFC Championship Game if they are able to play like they did on Sunday.

Random Thoughts: All of my random thoughts will come in an in-depth feature post on my entire weekend trip to San Francisco. I hope to have that post published by mid-week. Stay tuned!

In addition to “Weekend in San Francisco 2013” post in the middle of this week, make sure to check back on Saturday as I preview next week’s matchup with the New York Giants. Go Hawks!

Commentary: Why I Hate the San Francisco 49ers

10 Sep
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Photo Courtesy: Deadspin.com

*As a part of rivalry week and “hate week,” I give you a special look into my past as I detail the origin and evolution of my hatred of the San Francisco 49ers*

Ask a Green Bay Packers fan what they think about the Chicago Bears. Ask a New York Giants fan what they think about the Dallas Cowboys. Ask a Baltimore Ravens fan what they think about the Pittsburgh Steelers. Fans of these teams would probably go on a rant about every single little detail they hate about their rival team. Now ask a Seattle Seahawks fan what they think about the San Francisco 49ers. Just the thought of answering that question would make many Seahawks fans want to puke, myself included.

But what if I were to tell you there was a time where I actually vaguely respected the San Francisco 49ers?

When I was 10 years old the Seahawks were still in the AFC West. We would play San Francisco in the regular season once every three or four years but we would see them almost every year in the preseason.  The 49ers were scheduled to come to Husky Stadium to play the Seahawks in the 2000 preseason and I told my dad that if there was one team I wanted to see and one game I wanted to go to, it would be San Francisco in the preseason. I wanted to see Jerry Rice play against the Seahawks because I was a fan of the way Rice played the game. Unfortunately I did not get to go to the game but I watched on television as the Seahawks beat San Francisco 25-21.

Fast forward two seasons to 2002. The Seahawks are now in the NFC West with the 49ers, the Arizona Cardinals, and the St. Louis Rams. The Seahawks struggled to create a strong rivalry with any of these teams until 2004 when the Rams beat the Seahawks three times. Even though the 12th Man focused their hatred primarily on St. Louis, I always held a grudge against the San Francisco 49ers. Even today it is hard to pinpoint exactly why. Maybe it was the infamous “Sharpie touchdown” Terrell Owens scored against the Seahawks on Monday Night Football in 2002. Or maybe it was the fact that as a young boy I was envious of their 5 Super Bowl championships and the storied history that the Seahawks did not have.

In October 2003 I went to my first Seahawks/49ers game with my dad; at home on Sunday Night Football. We beat the 49ers 21-20 but the primetime atmosphere and the fans around me showed, to an extent, maybe why I held a dislike for the 49ers. There were two 49ers fans a couple rows down from us. As the game went on everyone around us became more and more belligerent. The only trash talk that surfaced from the men in their red 49ers jerseys was about their championships, and several off-color inappropriate statements, even for a 13-year old like me to hear.

It was going to be a tradition for me and my dad to go to one regular season Seahawks game together each season in our new stadium. This experience ruined that tradition. I did not go to another regular season game with my dad until I became a season ticket holder in 2006.

Because the Seahawks and 49ers were not good at the same time for the first few years together in the NFC West, the rivalry was pretty muted and I only displayed a dislike for the 49ers, much like my dislike of our other division rival Arizona.

That’s when everything changed.

In 2007, my insubstantial dislike turned into authentic hatred.

My dad and I flew down to San Francisco in September 2007 for the Seahawks week 4 game against the 49ers at Candlestick Park (Monster Park at the time). Remember this was in the middle of the 49ers stretch of mediocrity in the 2000’s but even though this was my first ever road Seahawks game I was not expecting the hostile environment that greeted me that sunny September day along the Bay. After tailgating with a small group of Seahawks fans the two of us took the long walk from the back of the stadium parking lot into the stadium. It is a straight street that leads directly to the gate and as you walk you have 49ers fans tailgating, lining the street along the concrete barriers on each side of you. This walk was one of the most intimidating moments of my fanhood as I heard everything from verbal threats, chants of “sea chickens” and “seacocks,” and even in some serious, drunken cases, objects (mostly food) thrown in our direction. The Seahawks won the game 23-3 but I remember telling my dad on the way back to the car “could you imagine if we had LOST the game? We wouldn’t have gotten out of here alive!”

Fast forward to present day. The Seahawks and 49ers are co-contenders for both the NFC West title and the NFC championship. Head coaches Pete Carroll and Jim Harbaugh have a personal rivalry that extends back to their days as college coaches, and the rivalry between fans of both teams has blossomed from petty “trash talk” hate to “I am going to kick your 49er ass” hate (If you’ve been to a Seahawks/49ers game you know what I am talking about.)

I may hate the concrete dump that is Candlestick Park (like Ian Furness from 950 KJR stated, “I’ve had a better experience in a port-o-potty”). I may hate the fact that San Francisco’s history is consistently thrown in my face for no good reason (no Seahawks fan gives a flying f**k about your 5 Super Bowl rings). I may hate Jim Harbaugh (prick), Colin Kaepernick (douche bag), and the rest of the 49ers’ roster, but if you asked me today why I hate the San Francisco 49ers, there is no question that the primary reason is the classlessness and disrespect displayed by the “Niner Empire.” I have been to Seahawks road games in 5 different cities and the disrespect that is dished by 49ers fans completely trumps the banter that I have heard in the other cities I have been to combined. It truly is not even close. When people talk about places they would never see their team play in, Oakland and Philadelphia immediately come to mind because of the verbal and sometimes physical abuse those fan bases are infamously known for. In my opinion, San Francisco and Candlestick Park is the worst experience an NFL fan could possibly endure. You might ask “if it is as bad as you say it is, then why do you even bother going down to San Francisco?” The answer is easy. My love for the Seahawks is too strong to keep me from going into enemy territory to cheer on my team. Over the past two seasons, I have been to every game, both home and away, between these two teams and I am going to both games again this season. Over the course of these four games, I have lost more and more respect (among the little respect I initially had) of 49er fans from both a general and personal perspective. There is definitely a reason why undercover cops are forced to be used at 49ers home games to try to eliminate the unnecessary amount of unruly behavior among their fans. Here are some interactions I have noticed between 49ers and Seahawks fans over the past two years:

  • September 2011: A 49ers fan mocks my red head afro at Candlestick Park.
  • September 2011: A drunken 49ers fan threatens to throw a fellow Seahawks fan off a Candlestick Park escalator. (The Seahawk fan was ignoring him the entire time and did absolutely nothing to bring that threat upon himself).
  • September 2011: A 49ers fan yells “BOOO” from kissing distance away from my face.
  • December 2011: A 49ers fan sitting behind me at CenturyLink Field disrespectfully dictates me to sit down and threatens to call security.
  • October 2012: During tailgating at Candlestick Park, a 49ers fan playing catch retrieves the overthrown football in my general vicinity. He threatens me not to touch the ball.
  • October 2012: More “ginger” jokes made towards me at Candlestick Park.
  • December 2012: Security is called to my seats at CenturyLink Field due to unruly behavior in the seat next to me, opening up the possibility that another appearance by security would result in me getting ejected from the stadium and me losing the right to my season tickets.

The rivalry between the Seahawks and 49ers is destined to heat up both on and off the field in the coming months and probably the coming years. If you are attending this week’s game or ever attend a game between the Seahawks and 49ers in the future here are some rules I follow that you should consider following also:

  1. Never go out of your way to make an opposing fan angry, especially on the road.
  2. In enemy territory, stick to cheering on your team only. On the road, leave it to other fans to boo the opponent because you are always outnumbered.
  3. Never make banter and trash talk personal. Nothing positive ever comes out of making it personal.
  4. Avoid cussing and excessive drinking. Heavy drinking contributed to the majority of those negative interactions mentioned earlier.
  5. Never stab anyone in the parking lot.

I believe it is healthy to have rivals and to have dislike and even hatred towards an opposing team. That is a big part of what makes NFL football so special and unique. My personal experiences have shaped my hatred of the San Francisco 49ers to a level that makes me cringe whenever I see or hear something that paints the 49ers in a positive light. If you have ever been to a Seahawks/49ers game I hope you know where I am coming from when I detail the evolution of my hatred of the San Francisco 49ers.